Home » Keeping The Circus Alive - abusing amusements and amusing abusers in Dickens subversive wonderland. by Daniel Rovira
Keeping The Circus Alive - abusing amusements and amusing abusers in Dickens subversive wonderland. Daniel Rovira

Keeping The Circus Alive - abusing amusements and amusing abusers in Dickens subversive wonderland.

Daniel Rovira

Published
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
20 pages
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 About the Book 

On the 28th June 1938, whilst the majority of the population was watching the coronation of the Queen, Charles Dickens was revelling in the festivities of Hyde Park a few miles away. This small act of subversion embodies the very ethos of theMoreOn the 28th June 1938, whilst the majority of the population was watching the coronation of the Queen, Charles Dickens was revelling in the festivities of Hyde Park a few miles away. This small act of subversion embodies the very ethos of the entertainment Dickens was watching and his anti-authoritarian attitude toward it characterizes his ‘carnivalesque’ novels. As is his fiction, the fair – or its larger counterpart, the circus – was ‘absurd and charming, breathtaking and predictable … eclectic, yet also type-ridden’. Even though performed in the ring, the circus resists circumscription. The circus is paradox. Synonymous with Dickens’ work, it displays a carnival subversion of social norms in its profuse display of the grotesque whilst simultaneously pandering to the needs of the populous to market and sell its product- it is both booming and ‘predominantly mute’, both seemingly preternatural in its showmanship yet completely anchored in a human ‘sense of actuality’, an ‘artificial Eden’ yet a tangible embodiment of the bricked-over Victorian imagination.